Monday, July 24, 2017

How KDE is staying busy during the summer months

As an educator, the one question I hear more than almost any other is, “Do you get the summers off?” In a word, no.
Principal Tamala Howard of Uniontown Elementary School (Union County) snaps a quick picture with 5th-grade students, from left, Evan Logsdon, Olivia Burke, Kaitlyn Thompson and Maggie Baird from the school's Leader in Me Student Lighthouse Team. Union County was one of 22 school districts to participate in kid·FRIENDLy – Kids Focused, Responsible, Imaginative, Engaged and Determined to Learn – funded by a $41 million Race-to-the-Top-District grant that focused on helping schools build personalized learning and discover ways to empower students. (Photo submitted)

Kid-FRIENDLy shifts districts, teachers to personalized learning for all

Kentucky is now one of the national leaders in student empowerment due to a $41 million Race-to-the Top-District grant the U.S. Department of Education awarded in 2013 for a project between the Green River Regional Educational Cooperative and the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative.

Effective mental health prevention and intervention approaches and resources

Commissioner Stephen Pruitt discusses effective mental health prevention and intervention approaches and resources for the K-12 system.
Students in Whitney McWhorter’s class at Lemons Mill Elementary (Scott County) explain the responsibilities of employees serving on a marketing team. Over five weeks, the entire 2nd-grade class at the school divided into teams, such as accounting and marketing, to create a new business. Their pop-up businesses were showcased at the school's Exhibition Night in late March. Submitted photo by Rebecca Powell

Second-graders learn how to create a business

What happens when you combine six creative teachers, 150 enthusiastic 2nd-graders and a desire for project-based learning? You get six totally amazing and highly successful businesses!

Kentucky’s English and mathematics standards up for feedback

This summer, we are working on the standards for both English/language arts (E/LA) and mathematics. Please take some time and give us your thoughts on our draft standards and let us know how they can be improved.

Taking your place at the table

It is Teacher Appreciation Week – a time that should be celebrated on the highest levels, but is often overlooked. So, if you will...
This sketch shows what the Kentucky School for the Blind looked like in 1884, when the school already was 42 years old. The school is celebrating its 175th year of serving Kentucky students with visual impairments. Submitted photo

Kentucky School for the Blind celebrating 175 years of service

Each May the Kentucky School for the Blind (KSB) celebrates Founder’s Day, an event that commemorates its rich history of providing educational services to Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. This year’s event is especially significant because the school is celebrating its 175th anniversary.

Ensuring a strong public education system is top priority

Commissioner Pruitt shares his thoughts about the implications of House Bill 520, which was signed into law in March and gives local school boards and the mayors of Lexington and Louisville the authority to authorize charter schools.

Doing the impossible for Kentucky’s students

Our new vision for Kentucky education is one that puts students at the center of our work, values the profession of education, and values the education of the whole child, not simply test scores.
Heidi Givens

Finding my new why

Frankfort Independent's Heidi Givens describes whyshe changed her teaching beliefs regarding the rights of deaf and hard-of-hearing students.