Archive | News

March event targets student preparation

In 2012, Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday talked with sophomore Alex Kearns about his future college and career plans during Operation Preparation at Gallatin County High School. Photo by Amy Wallot, March 15, 2012

In 2012, Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday talked with sophomore Alex Kearns about his future college and career plans during Operation Preparation at Gallatin County High School. Photo by Amy Wallot, March 15, 2012

This month, thousands of Kentucky students will be getting advice on what they can do academically to prepare for college or career as part of the third annual Operation Preparation.

During Operation Preparation, trained community advisors meet with 8th- and 10th-grade students to review each student’s Individual Learning Plans (ILPs) and talk about:

• career aspirations and required education/training
• whether the student is on target to meet his or her goals
• whether the student is taking the courses recommended to prepare him or her for the future

“We want to provide every resource available to help students realize their potential, maximize their academic preparation and stay on track for success during and after high school whether they choose college or a career pathway,” said Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday.  Continue Reading

Posted in News0 Comments

Kentucky Green Ribbon School award winner named

Wellington Elementary (Fayette County) has been named a 2014 Kentucky Green Ribbon School by the Kentucky Department of Education, along with its “green” partners, the Kentucky Environmental Education Council; Department for Energy Development and Independence; Kentucky School Boards Association; and Kentucky National Energy Education Development Project.

The school becomes a nominee for the 2014 National Green Ribbon School Awards, which will be announced on April 22. If selected as an honoree for the 2014 National Green Ribbon Schools Awards, representatives from Wellington Elementary will be invited to a recognition ceremony in Washington, D.C. on July 22.

This award is a comprehensive recognition of exemplary achievement in environmental impact, health and education. It recognizes schools where staff, students, officials and communities have worked together to produce energy efficient, sustainable and healthy school environments and to ensure the sustainability and environmental literacy of graduates. Continue Reading

Posted in News0 Comments

Three outstanding educators join Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, left, and Gov. Steve Beshear welcomed teacher Cynthia S. Wooden (Kenton County) into the Gov. Louie B. Nunn Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame at the Capitol Rotunda. Photo by Clinton Lewis/WKU, Feb. 6, 2014

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, left, and Gov. Steve Beshear welcomed teacher Cynthia S. Wooden (Kenton County) into the Gov. Louie B. Nunn Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame at the Capitol Rotunda.
Photo by Clinton Lewis/WKU, Feb. 6, 2014

Three outstanding educators with a combined experience of more than 100 years were inducted into Gov. Louie B. Nunn Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame this month.

Debra Burgess of Murray, Golda Pensol Walbert of Glasgow and Cynthia S. Wooden of Florence were all recognized in Frankfort during a luncheon at Berry Hill Mansion and an induction ceremony at the Capitol Rotunda.

“Our teachers work tirelessly day in and day out to better educate our young people about classroom and life lessons,” Gov. Steve Beshear said. “Today, I am very proud to recognize and honor three outstanding teachers as they are inducted into the Kentucky Teachers Hall of Fame. Congratulations to Golda Pensol Walbert, Debra Burgess and Cynthia S. Wooden, and thank you for your lifelong dedication to education.”

Created in 2000 through a gift from former Kentucky Gov. Louie B. Nunn, the Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame recognizes the vital role primary and secondary teachers play in educating Kentucky’s youth and ensuring they are college- and career-ready Continue Reading

Posted in News0 Comments

Student results hold steady on PLAN and EXPLORE tests

Overall student performance on EXPLORE and PLAN tests remained relatively unchanged in 2013, according to data released today by the Kentucky Department of Education.

The assessments, precursors to the ACT college entrance exam given to all public high school juniors in the state, test knowledge in English, mathematics, reading and science.

“We saw some minor shifts up and down in the results but they still compare favorably with the rest of the nation,” Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday said. “In fact, in a couple of subjects, our students outperform students elsewhere.”

He pointed out that more Kentucky students took the tests this year and that can result in somewhat lower scores.

The EXPLORE test is given to all 8th-grade public school students. It provides an early indicator of readiness for college, provides important information for building a high school academic plan and helps students identify careers in which they might be interested.

The PLAN test is given to all 10th-grade public school students in Kentucky each September. It serves as the midpoint check of academic progress in high school. It is designed to improve students’ preparation for education, training and work after high school while students still have time to adjust their high school courses.

“When compared nationally, our biggest deficits are in math performance,” Holliday said. “These results confirm what we already know from the National Assessment for Educational Continue Reading

Posted in News1 Comment

King receives Milken Family Foundation Award

William King, freshman class principal at Bowling Green High School (BGHS) in the Bowling Green Independent school district, was joined by state officials and former Milken Family Foundation National Educator Award winners on Wednesday. Pictured, from left: Ryan Williams (KY ’12), Ruth Sweazy (KY ’02), Field Assistant to Senator Mitch McConnell Sandra Potter (in back), Cyndi Boggs (KY ’00), William King (KY ’13), Madeline Abramson , wife of Lt. Governor Jerry Abramson, Kentucky Commissioner of Education Dr. Terry Holliday, Kentucky Board of Education member William Twyman (KY ’93) and Milken Educator Awards Senior Vice President Dr. Jane Foley. Photo courtesy of the Milken Family Foundation

William King, freshman class principal at Bowling Green High School (BGHS) in the Bowling Green Independent school district, was joined by state officials and former Milken Family Foundation National Educator Award winners on Wednesday. Pictured, from left: Ryan Williams (KY ’12), Ruth Sweazy (KY ’02), Field Assistant to Senator Mitch McConnell Sandra Potter (in back), Cyndi Boggs (KY ’00), William King (KY ’13), Madeline Abramson , wife of Lt. Governor Jerry Abramson, Kentucky Commissioner of Education Dr. Terry Holliday, Kentucky Board of Education member William Twyman (KY ’93) and Milken Educator Awards Senior Vice President Dr. Jane Foley. Photo courtesy of the Milken Family Foundation

William King, freshman class principal at Bowling Green High School (BGHS) in the Bowling Green Independent school district, is Kentucky’s newest recipient of the Milken Family Foundation National Educator Award and $25,000.

Education Commissioner Terry Holliday; Madeline Abramson, wife of Lt. Gov. Jerry Abramson; Milken Family Foundation Vice-President Jane Foley and other dignitaries surprised King with the award Wednesday during an all-school assembly.

“This award is about bringing attention to our unsung heroes of education,” Holliday said.  “Not only is it validation for the job they are doing, but also this award should be motivation and inspiration to all current and future highly effective educators.” Holliday said the message is clear, “We value you and thank you for what you are doing every day to ensure all of our students graduate from high school college/career-ready.”

King began his tenure as freshman class principal in 2010, and joined the school district in 2001 when he was hired as an administrative assistant. He has served as a BGHS social studies teacher and a curriculum coordinator. King earned a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Western Kentucky University. Continue Reading

Posted in News0 Comments

Students urged to eat breakfast at school

Bridgeport Elementary in Frankfort, Ky. March 12, 2008. Photo by Amy WallotStudents who eat breakfast show improved academic performance — including a general increase in math and reading scores; yet many Kentucky students don’t take advantage of the opportunity to eat breakfast at school.

On Wednesday, the Kentucky Board of Education passed a resolution promoting participation in the school breakfast program and kicking off the Kentucky Breakfast Challenge.

While more than half of the state’s 650,000 public school students qualify for free or reduced-price meals, only 39 percent of Kentucky students participate in the school breakfast program.

As part of the Kentucky Breakfast Challenge, the Kentucky Department of Education’s Division of School and Community Nutrition is partnering with the Southeast United Dairy Industry Association (SUDIA) to work with districts on innovative ways to increase breakfast participation and encourage districts to consider alternative service options such as grab and go bags, in-class meals and meals served after the first class period. Grants to support this work will be funded by SUDIA as will cash prizes for winning districts in the Kentucky Breakfast Challenge.

The Division of School and Community Nutrition plans to highlight districts’ breakfast best practices during the School Nutrition Association’s National School Breakfast Week on March 3-7.

To read a press release on the Kentucky Board of Education’s resolution on the school breakfast program, which includes a copy of the resolution, click here.

Posted in News0 Comments

Kentucky’s lowest-performing schools making gains

Kentucky Board of Education member Leo Calderon asks about a priority schools update during the KBE meeting in Frankfort, Ky. Photo by Amy Wallot, Feb. 5, 2013

Kentucky Board of Education member Leo Calderon asks about a priority schools update during the KBE meeting in Frankfort, Ky.
Photo by Amy Wallot, Feb. 5, 2013

Kentucky’s lowest-performing schools are making promising progress on increasing student achievement, the Kentucky Board of Education learned at its meeting yesterday.

Based on 2012-13 Unbridled Learning Assessment and Accountability System results, of the 41 schools named as Priority or Persistently Low-Achieving (PLA) Schools — identified as being in the bottom 5 percent of schools in the Commonwealth:

• 6 schools scored in the Distinguished category, the highest of all performance categories
• 8 schools scored in the Proficient category
• 19 schools were categorized as Progressing (met annual measurable objective, student participation rate and graduation rate)

Other highlights include:

• 11 of the 41 schools had overall scores above the state average
• 36 of 41 schools met their Annual Measureable Objective
• 21 of 41 schools achieved their College- and Career-Readiness (CCR) targets
• One school (Leslie County High School) progressed out of Priority status

“The results show it is possible to turnaround low-achieving schools,” said Commissioner of Education Terry Holliday. “These schools are focused on doing what is best for kids and ensuring their students have the skills and knowledge they need to be college- and career-ready. The improvement we’re seeing is a testament to the outstanding leadership and diligent work of teachers, principals, students and parents,” Holliday said.

While Holliday is positive about the gains being made, he acknowledged there are still a number of Priority Schools that continue to need assistance. The Kentucky Department of Education is currently performing diagnostic reviews in the lowest-performing schools to determine what needs to happen to turn the schools around. Staff reported that several schools have recently replaced their principals and are starting to see results.

“Leadership makes a difference,” Holliday said “These schools need strong leadership, a strong council and on-site support for math and literacy,” he said.

Posted in News0 Comments

Kentucky teachers support Core Academic Standards

Kentucky teachers, like those in a nationwide poll, are enthusiastic about teaching the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) according to data released by the Kentucky Department of Education.

The data stem from the Primary Sources survey of 20,000 public school teachers nationwide last summer. The survey, conducted by the Harrison Group, asked teachers across the country their thoughts on implementing the Common Core State Standards — a set of clear, consistent guidelines for what students should know and be able to do for success after graduation. Results of that survey showed:

  • 97 percent of teachers are aware of the new English/language arts and mathematics standards
  •  73 percent are enthusiastic about implementing the new standards in their classroom
  •  73 percent believe implementing the standards is or will be challenging
  • 74 percent believe implementing the standards will require them to make changes in their teaching practice
  • 73 percent felt they were prepared to teach the new standards in their classrooms
  • 76 percent believe the standards will have a positive impact on students’ ability to think critically and use reasoning skills

Continue Reading

Posted in News0 Comments

Half of incoming kindergarten students ready to succeed in school

Terry Tolan, executive director of the GovernorÕs Office of Early Childhood, center, has a group of student demonstrate a sample of the kindergarten readiness screener, like identifying where your ear is located, during a press conference with Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, left, and Gov. Steve Beshear, right, at the Capitol. Photo by Amy Wallot, Jan. 30, 2013

Terry Tolan, executive director of the GovernorÕs Office of Early Childhood, center, has a group of student demonstrate a sample of the kindergarten readiness screener, like identifying where your ear is located, during a press conference with Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, left, and Gov. Steve Beshear, right, at the Capitol.
Photo by Amy Wallot, Jan. 30, 2013

Nearly half of students who started kindergarten this school year ready to learn and succeed. However, nearly 26,000 students entered school unprepared for kindergarten work, according to results of the first statewide implementation of the common Kindergarten Readiness Screener.

“From day one, these students may be at a disadvantage; they are behind, and some lack the foundational skills on which to build,” Gov. Steve Beshear said. “Too often, they don’t catch up with their peers. As a result, these students may face years of poor grades and negative school experiences that usually only end when they drop out or graduate from high school unprepared for college or career.”

Beshear announced the results at a news conference with Education Commissioner Terry Holliday and Terry Tolan, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Early Childhood.

Teachers administered the BRIGANCE K Screener to 50, 532 kindergarten students in all 173 school districts at the beginning of the 2013-14 school year. The screener measures how well a child is prepared to succeed in school at the time the screener is administered. Students are asked their name and age, to recite the alphabet and to count to 30, among other tasks.

The common kindergarten screener provides teachers with key information early in the school year that they can use to guide instruction to meet the individual needs of all students. Continue Reading

Posted in News1 Comment

‘Let’s Move’ encourages students, schools to get active

More Kentucky students are kicking their sedentary habits and getting active thanks to the “Let’s Move!” Active Schools initiative.

The physical education program empowers teachers, principals, administrators and parents to create active environments that enable all students to get moving; helps promote physical activity before, during and after school; and encourages parent and community involvement in helping students become healthier.

“The Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) is committed to improving the health and wellness of Kentucky’s students,” said Education Commissioner Terry Holliday. “‘Let’s Move!’ helps schools create active environments that get students moving every day and supports their success in school.”

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), students need at least 60 minutes of daily physical activity. Since young people spend an average of six to seven hours in school each day, the school environment is an ideal place to help students achieve the recommended amount of physical activity. Studies show that students who participate in regular physical activity also perform better in school. Continue Reading

Posted in News0 Comments

Page 9 of 40« First...7891011...152025...Last »