Sunday, February 17, 2019
Brianna Guy, left, took every class offered by former Bell County High School family and consumer sciences teacher Rosemary Jones. Now Guy, a student at Western Kentucky University, hopes to follow in Jones’ footsteps at the school, where the family and consumer sciences program was suspended this year upon Jones’ retirement. Guy said Jones’ classes gave her a place to fit in at school, and she came to appreciate the curriculum she hopes to teach. Photo submitted

‘It teaches you life’

A retired family and consumer sciences teacher from Bell County was honored by the Association for Career and Technical Education with a community service award.
Shelby Frazier, the senior class president at Frederick Douglass High School (Fayette County), shows visitors to the school a banner signed by members of the current freshman class as part of a commitment to graduation ceremony that will be displayed at their graduation in 2022. Freshmen at the three schools that are part of the Academies of Lexington are in their own academies that offer personal and career exploration and serve to help students make the transition from middle school to high school. Photo by Megan Gross, Dec. 3, 2018

A partnership to prepare students

Three Fayette County high schools are offering career academies designed to prepare students for life after high school and to provide the type of workforce local business and industry is seeking.
Students in Angela Page’s creek class at Louisville Male High School (Jefferson County) take to Beargrass Creek in canoes as they perform water quality tests on the Ohio River tributary. Page’s class exposes students to work in chemistry, forestry, botany and other disciplines. Students in Angela Page’s creek class take to Beargrass Creek in canoes as they perform water quality tests on the Ohio River tributary. Page’s class exposes students to work in chemistry, forestry, botany and other disciplines. Photo submitted

Advanced learning at the water’s edge

A Jefferson County teacher gives her students a close look at the results of human interactions with ecosystems in an advanced ecology class that places an emphasis on field study.
Commissioner of Education Wayne Lewis, left, talks with Fayette County superintendent Manny Caulk during a visit to Frederick Douglass High School (Fayette County). Lewis said he has always been in awe of great teaching, and that he looks for it during school visits. Photo by Megan Gross, Dec. 3, 2018

From Katrina to the commissioner’s office

Wayne Lewis talks about some of the things that sparked his interest in education and educational leadership during his childhood and young adulthood and the path that led him to become Kentucky’s commissioner of education.
David Sandlin makes a point to student Cameryn McPherson during Sandlin’s financial literacy class at Walton-Verona High School (Walton-Verona Independent). Sandlin, who worked as an investment consultant prior to becoming a teacher, will serve on both a business and education advisory panel and a standards revision and writing committee during the process of developing financial literacy standards. Photo by Megan Gross, Nov. 19, 2018

Paving the path to financial literacy

The Kentucky Department of Education is developing standards to be used in a new graduation requirement for financial literacy.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis

The imperative of achievement gap closure in Kentucky

One of the most notable of the education challenges we continue to face are socioeconomic and racial achievement gaps. Even with the progress we have made in recent decades with increases in achievement overall, we have made very little progress with closing such gaps.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis

Early identification key for children with dyslexia

The Kentucky Department of Education recently released a K-3 Dyslexia Toolkit for families and teachers. This 20-page document provides guidance for teachers about how to identify and provide support for children who have dyslexia.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis

Legislative agenda prioritizes student success and parent empowerment

At its Dec. 5 meeting, the Kentucky Board of Education voted to approve a list of legislative priorities for the 2019 session of the General Assembly that places student success and preparedness and family empowerment at the center of our legislative efforts during the upcoming session.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis

Increasing opportunities for student success in college, career and life

One of my top priorities here at the Kentucky Department of Education is to increase the number and percentage of high school students successfully completing early postsecondary opportunities, such as dual credit, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis

The Kentucky high school diploma has to mean more

We have reached the point in Kentucky’s history when change to our minimum standards for high school graduation is necessary to ensure that our children are well-prepared for postsecondary education and the workforce.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis

Time to break down educational barriers in Kentucky’s rural schools

Almost half of Kentucky’s population lives in rural areas. That means a significant portion of Kentucky’s students are being educated in rural school districts. Our rural schools face unique challenges compared to our suburban and urban schools.
Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis, center, met with members of the Commissioner’s Student Advisory Council on Feb. 13. Twenty-six students from across Kentucky were selected to serve on the council, which advises the Kentucky Department of Education about how policies impact students in the classroom. Photo by Donna Melton, Feb. 13, 2019

Student Advisory Council talks about teacher shortages, inclusion

The Kentucky Department of Education’s Student Advisory Council met Feb. 13 for the first time in the 2019-2020 school year.
News

KDE seeking applications for Technology Standards committees

Applications are being accepted for the Technology Standards Review and Development Committees and Advisory Panels.
Mark Broering hugs Hope Schleper after the graduation ceremony. Photo by Bobby Ellis, June 4, 2018

Minimum high school graduation requirements proposal advances

 During the Administrative Regulation Review Subcommittee meeting Feb. 11 at the Capitol Annex in Frankfort, Kentucky Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis testified in support of amendments to 704 KAR 3:305, proposed minimum high school graduation requirements.
Angie Beavin, Milken Award Winner

Franklin County’s Angie Beavin receives $25,000 Milken Educator Award

Fifth-grade teacher Angie Beavin knows how to meet the needs of her students at Peaks Mill Elementary (Franklin County), and it all starts with reading. As the saying goes, reading is fundamental, but in the contemporary classroom you could add that data helps get the job done.
News

Students selected for Commissioner’s Student Advisory Council

Thirteen Kentucky public high school students have been named to the Commissioner’s Student Advisory Council, a group that provides input to Kentucky Commissioner of Education Wayne Lewis.
Announcements

Free teen depression webinar on March 21

Families for Depression Awareness is presenting a free “Understanding Teen Depression” webinar 7-8:15 p.m. ET March 21.
Announcements

WKU offering study abroad in the UK this summer

The School of Teacher Education at Western Kentucky University is offering three to six hours of credit in the United Kingdom June 28-July 8.
Announcements

Virtual reality equipment grants available

Fios.Verizon.com is offering two $1,000 grants for kindergarten to grade 12 teachers. To apply, instructors need to submit a creative lesson plan detailing how you would use virtual reality equipment in your classroom.
Contests

2019 Kentucky Derby Poster Contest

High school students throughout the Commonwealth are invited to submit their own rendition of what they think Derby day looks like in a contest to design a Derby poster the governor and first lady will display in the Capitol.
Contests

Entries sought for tick-borne disease prevention poster contest

The Kentucky Department for Public Health is inviting school-age children across the Commonwealth to create and submit original artwork for a chance to win cash prizes in a tick-borne disease prevention poster contest sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Independent District Health Department.

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