Meet new board members Jones, Twyman

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Jones
Jones

Jones believes students succeed with parent, community support

Martha Jones, of Boyd County, represents the 7th Supreme Court District. She is a former social worker and continuing education counselor. She also worked with Friends of the Children, a non-profit organization in Ashland, to assist disadvantaged schoolchildren. Jones’ term will expire April 14, 2014.

In your opinion, what makes Kentucky schools tick?

The ability to change directions to better meet the needs of the students in an ever-changing global economy.

Why is what you do as a board member important to teachers today?

The board will play an important role in supporting teachers to help them meet the challenges of preparing students for success in the 21st century.

Where is education in Kentucky headed?

With the Transforming Education in Kentucky (TEK) initiative and with the support of teachers, hopefully Kentucky will implement new strategies to better prepare students to compete in the global economy.

What impact do you hope to bring to the board in the immediate future?

An emphasis on supporting students with learning disabilities.

What do you want Kentucky’s past and current teachers to know about you?

I understand the challenges of those teaching students with learning disabilities.

Other than more money, what do Kentucky schools need most?

The support of parents and the community.

What are the biggest obstacles facing Kentucky children?

Gaining the skills necessary to achieve success in higher education.

What long-term goals do you have as a member of the board?

To support those who will develop and implement new strategies. The work of the TEK task force is very important.

What personal trait will serve you best as a board member?

Caring for students with learning disabilities.

How will you know that the board has been successful?

As pointed out by Gov. Beshear and Dr. Holliday, we must dramatically increase the number of students who obtain postsecondary and/or technical training beyond high school.  Currently, only 25 percent of high school 9th-graders obtain the degrees necessary to successfully compete in the labor market.

State headed in right direction, ‘need to step up the pace,’ says Twyman

Twyman
Twyman

William Twyman, of Barren County, represents the 2nd Supreme Court District. He is a former educator and national Milken Educator award winner. He works with the consulting firm Educational Directions. Twyman’s term will expire April 14, 2014.

Where is education in Kentucky headed?

Kentucky is headed in the right direction with its new common core (standards) and new assessment system; we simply need to step up the pace.

Why is what you do as a board member important to teachers today?

I want to help create policies and procedures that enable teachers do their jobs to the best of their ability.

What long-term goals do you have as a member of the board?

I want to do all that I can to ensure that each and every child in Kentucky gets a world-class education.

Other than parents and teachers, who – or what – has had the biggest effect on our students’ educations in the last few years in your opinion?

Assessments and standards.

In your opinion, what makes Kentucky schools tick?

It is dedicated teachers and principals plus all the support staff; add in caring supportive parents and communities.

What will teachers need most from the board?

They need direction and support in order to move students to the level of world-class performers.

What are the greatest successes you have seen in Kentucky schools?

Kentucky, perhaps more than any other state, attempts to educate the whole child and in all content areas.

Other than more money, what do Kentucky schools need most?

More dedicated teachers, principals and parents supporting students as they progress through our schools.

What major change would you make to improve Kentucky schools?

Make sure we have systems in place that allow students to become world-class performers.

How will you know that the board has been successful?

When our students are performing at and above others on assessments like ACT, NRT (norm-referenced tests) and so on.

Who was your favorite teacher and why?

My high school algebra teacher. She insisted that each and every child would learn, and she did all the extra things required to make that learning possible.

What have you gained from your time as an educator that will help you on the board?

I have learned there is no replacement for top-notch teachers and principals in each of our schools across Kentucky.

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