Wednesday, December 8, 2021
Tags Erlanger-Elsmere Independent

Tag: Erlanger-Elsmere Independent

Kentucky Text Set Project connects teachers and books

The Kentucky Text Set Project is intensive training designed to help teachers begin creating challenging, grade-level specific texts sets over a variety of engaging literacy and literary topics.

Superintendent Spotlight: Kathy Burkhardt, Erlanger-Elsmere Independent

The Erlanger-Elsmere Independent school district is very diverse with an extremely dedicated board of education and wonderful teachers, staff members, parents and community members...

Pre-K working in Erlanger-Elsmere schools

Erlanger-Elsmere Independent is working with parents, community groups and the United Way to make sure every student is ready for kindergarten.

New toolbox aims to help school leaders build early childhood support

Recent kindergarten readiness results show that only half of Kentucky’s children arrived at school ready to do kindergarten work this year. In response, the Kentucky Department of Education and the Governor’s Office of Early Childhood have released a new tool called the “Superintendent Toolbox” to help superintendents improve kindergarten readiness in their communities.

Ready to learn

Districts across the state are trying new ways to increase kindergarten readiness.

Two honored as PE teachers of the year

The 2014 KAHERD teachers of the year are Daniel Hill, a teacher at Tates Creek Elementary (Fayette County) and Rhonda Smith, a teacher at Lloyd Memorial High School (Elsmere-Erlanger Independent).

Letter grades ‘standard’-bearers no more

UK professors are hoping to use levels of content mastery to determine grades.

Final schools earn TELL survey cash

Kentucky schools and educators earned cash prizes recently for their participation in the fourth and final week of the Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning...

Miles Elementary goes to standards-based grading

For the second year in a row, students at Miles Elementary School (Erlanger-Elsmere Independent) won’t receive grades. Yet teachers and the principal say students and their parents are better informed about what the children know – and what skills and information they still need to master. Bryant Gillis, in his seventh year as principal, said he never figured out in his 36 years in education what an A really means.